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Here Are the 8 Most Exciting Healthy Eating Food Trends of 2016

sardine

New year, new foods!

Every year, there seems to be a new list of healthy buzz foods that are everywhere you look. Curious as to what 2016 brings? Here are the eight most exciting healthy food trends of 2016.

Hint: there are a few familiar edibles.

koji

1. Koji

Koji is really just rice, but it's got a bit more pizazz than that. Fermentation is in: things that rot, as it turns out, are good for you. Koji is rice that has been treated with Aspergillus oryzae, or "koji mold." Things that have gone bad also taste good, too, weirdly enough. For example, think about pickles and all that flavor in each sphere. Koji is traditionally used to make miso paste and soy sauce and is the base for umami. It's the ultimate way to add flavor with any additional salt.

avocado

2. Full-fat foods

Yes, it's time to embrace fat! Good fats like the stuff from avocado and fish is what's in now, and it makes sense: your body needs fat to function properly. Of course, everything should still be consumed in moderation, but go ahead and have that avocado toast, guilt free.

seaweed

3. Seaweed

Like some of the other items on this list, seaweed is also something that's sustainable, environmentally-friendly, and the best thing? There's a whole lot of it. In addition to how great it is for the environment, it's also really healthy: fibre, vitamin C, iron... it's got it all! Be prepared to snack on everything from dried seaweed, to sea vegetables in every dish.

Nooch

4. "Nooch"

It sounds like some sort of weird super power, but nooch is just short for nutritional yeast. It also kind of looks like dandruff, but it's full of vitamin B12, which is something that is lacking in most vegetarian diets as it is a vitamin commonly found in meat. Plus, with its cheesy flavor, it can be incorporated into just about anything, from macaroni to mashed potatoes.

Crickets

5. Bugs

Bleh. Bugs. Gross? Sure. But they are—gulp—the new protein of the future. Crickets, in particular, are getting a lot of attention as a sustainable alternative to animal products. They're also packed with iron, calcium, and magnesium. You'll start seeing bugs in protein bars really soon.

Quinoa Grain

6. Ancient grains

You're no stranger to ancient grains. Ancient grains are complex carbohydrates and are still in the spotlight. Farro, buckwheat, quinoa, and other ancient grains are high in fibre and dense in vitamin B, acting as the better alternative to white rice.

Chlorophyll

7. Chlorophyll

We've said it once and we'll say it again: chlorophyll is awesome. It's a magnesium-rich substance (it's chlorophyll's central atom) that has the ability to strengthen cells, cleanse the body and maintain functioning of circulatory and intestinal systems, and more. Say yes to the wheatgrass.

vegetable

8. Plant-based eating

Vegetables are so hot right now. The days of boring vegetable side dishes are gone, and here are the exciting and innovative ways of preparing vegetables—searing, roasting, pulverizing... you name it. Now, keep in mind: this doesn't necessarily mean that you're vegan. Plant-based diets simply mean more sustainable eating practices. More plants means fewer animals, and ultimately meaning that we'll still have animals for the future.

leaves

Evidently, the focuses of 2016 are sustainability and vegetables. One addition to your kitchen that would make some of these trends easier to acquire is an Urban Cultivator!

By growing your own, you are actively reducing our collective carbon footprint created through food transportation, and it would make #8, plant-based eating, easy as pie—you'd have vegetables all year long!

Which trend are you most excited for? Any additional ones that aren't on this list that you can't wait to try? Hit us up in the comments section!

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